Wildlife

Cattle Egret at rookery at St. Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park, St. Augustine, Florida.

Haunted?

May-Stringer House, Brooksville, Florida, built circa 1903. This Queen Anne style house is reportedly one of the most haunted structures in the state. (Infrared) [Click on the photo to view it in my gallery where you can see more of my work]

Orange City Town Hall

Orange City, Florida, Town Hall was built in 1928 at a cost of $20,000 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2002. The bell in the tower at Town Hall weighs 517 pounds. (HDR Photo, Bleach bypass effect) [Click on the photo to view it in my gallery where you can see more of my work]

Saint Marys River Bridge

Looking south toward Florida across the Saint Marys River, from Georgia side along the U.S. 17 bridge. [Click on the photo to view it in my gallery where you can see more of my work]

Goodwin Riverfront Park

Bridge between Palatka and East Palatka over the St. Johns River, from Goodwin Riverfront Park (Infrared) I shot this photo with a Panasonic GH2, full-spectrum infrared conversion, using a B+W 092 (695nm) external filter, before editing it in Photoshop. [Click on the photo to view it in my gallery where you can see more of my work]

Mandarin Holiday Marina

Mandarin Holiday Marina, Julington Creek, Jacksonville, Florida. (HDR) I shot this photo with my Olympus E-5 and edited it in Photoshop and Photomatix. [Click on the photo to view it in my gallery where you can see more of my work]

Mission Nombre de Dios

Footbridge and cross at Mission Nombre de Dios, St. Augustine, Florida. I shot this photo with my Panasonic GH2, full-spectrum infrared conversion, using a B+W 091 (630nm) Filter. I edited the photo using Photoshop. [Click on the photo to view it in my gallery where you can see more of my work]

As Seen on TV

Home of Claudia Joy and Major General Michael Holden at fictional Fort Marshall of Lifetime series, “Army Wives.” Shot in officers’ quarters section of former Charleston Navy Yard, North Charleston, South Carolina. I shot this photo with my Nikon D700, and edited it with Photoshop and Photomatix. [Click on the photo to view it in my gallery where you can see more of my work]

Patriots Point, South Carolina

U.S.S. Laffey (DD-724) and U.S.S. Yorktown (CV-10) both retired and now museums at Patriots Point, Mount Pleasant, South Carolina. While spending a few days in the Charleston area, I visited the Laffey and Yorktown. It was a nostalgic visit because I served aboard the USS Putnam (DD-757) that was the same class ship as the Laffey, as well as the USS Intrepid (CV-11) that is the same class as the Yorktown. I shot this photo with my Olympus E-5, using a 9-18mm wide angle lens. I edited it with Photoshop and Photomatix. (Click on the photo to go to my photo site where you can see more of my work.)

The Ring on the Campus of The Citadel

The Ring, Campus, The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, Charleston.History and symbolism. The ring has symbolized outstanding accomplishments both by the Corps of Cadets and South Carolina. Perhaps the most popular feature of the ring is the “Star of the West,” which commemorates the firing on a Union supply steamer by a detachment of Citadel cadets in January, 1861. This action was the powder keg which set off the War Between the States.Every aspect of the ring is symbolic of the history and tradition of the Cadet Corps from the Mexican War through both World Wars, to the present day, for The Citadel is a military college and the leadership, courage, and integrity found in good officers is embodied by the sword, found on the left shank of the ring. Crossing the sword is the rifle, the symbol of the infantry. Of equal importance in this world of political aggrandizement and perpetual military conflict are the concepts of freedom acquired and maintained only through a willingness to fight for it represented by the rifle surmounted by the oak leaves of toughness and victory blessed by peace, represented by the laurel wreath.On the right shank of the ring are found the United States and South Carolina colors, which depict the unity of the state and federal government. The cannon balls at the bottom of this shank indicate the continuing link between the Old Citadel on Marion Square and the Greater Citadel. When the college moved to its present location, the Civil War cannon balls piled before the Old Citadel were left behind. The oval crest has a reproduction of the palmetto tree in its background. Aside from representing the state tree of South Carolina, the Palmetto symbolizes a cadet-trained regiment of infantry that fought in the Mexican War and it represents a fort, built of Palmetto logs, that repelled a large British invasion fleet during the Revolutionary War. The two oval shields at the base of the tree are replicas of the state seals. I shot this photo with my Nikon D700, and edited it with Photoshop and Photomatix. [Click on the photo to view it in my gallery where you can see more of my work]